Myopia Prevention Vancouver

Myopia Prevention Vancouver

Myopia prevention vancouver specialists in Deep Cove. Come visit us today to delay myopia.

What is myopia?

Myopia, also called nearsightedness or shortsightedness, is the eye condition where objects nearby or a short distance away are clear but objects that are far away are blurred. It is caused by the eye being slightly too long.

Some children (and adult) eyes develop myopia and the percentage of people who develop it is increasing sharply. This site is about the science of myopia with the goal of stopping or slowing its progression. Myopia is getting worse around the world, even to the point of being called an epidemic by some. In some parts of Asia, 80% of the girls in high school are myopic. In the United States, myopia has increased 66% in thirty years so that now 42% of people aged 12-54 are myopic. It has become an issue of monumental importance affecting over a billion people around the world and it is getting worse.

How do I get myopia?

Myopia, or nearsightedness, is not inherited but is caused by excessive reading and other close work. After doing prolonged close work, the focusing muscle inside the eye locks up into a state of near focus. Over time this leads to permanent nearsightedness, an abnormal lengthening of the eye.

What does myopia do?

The “distance” or “minus power” glasses routinely prescribed accelerate this process by causing the world to appear closer. This causes the eyes to exert more focusing effort, resulting in even more myopia. Stronger glasses are prescribed again and again, creating a vicious circle of increasing myopia. This often leads to detached retina, macular degeneration and even blindness. Consequently, distance glasses should not be used for close work, only for distance. Most eye doctors do not reveal that the glasses they prescribe are harmful to our eyes. There are now over TWO BILLION nearsighted people in the world, made that way by their eye doctors.

Read more at http://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/myopia.htm